2019 AA Kinsey Report: Which Are the Cheapest Cars to Maintain?

2019 AA Kinsey Report: Which Are the Cheapest Cars to Maintain?

kinsey report

Since 1990, Malcolm Kinsey has compiled an annual survey, identifying the most expensive and the cheapest cars to maintain in South Africa. The latest report, for 2019, is now available.

This year, for the first time, the report is backed by the Automobile Association (AA).

When you’re considering buying a new car, it’s good to consider what the car is really going to cost you. Beyond its sales price, investigate factors like fuel efficiency and the costs of servicing and parts. Having a reputable supplier of reasonably priced parts and spares also makes a difference.

About the 2019 AA Kinsey report

The 2019 AA Kinsey report identifies average dealer prices for car parts in three subcategories – service, repair and crash parts. For each car model, the prices are combined to give an overall “total parts basket” cost.

The average costs are published for nine vehicle categories. These include entry-level and city cars, super minis, family favourites, compact crossovers, crossovers, executive crossover, single cabs, double cabs and executive saloons.

Kinsey commented that he’s “astounded” by how prices have escalated over the past 18 months. In some cases, parts baskets have gone up by over 40%!

Cheapest cars to maintain in South Africa for 2019

According to the latest AA-Kinsey report, these were the winners and losers in terms of cars with the cheapest parts in South Africa.

Entry-level and city cars

In order, cars in this category with the lowest total parts basket costs are the:

  • Datsun Go (R63,310), consistently the overall winner in this class
  • Renault Kwid (R66,707)
  • Ford Figo (R67,805).

The entry-level or city car with the most expensive parts (of those surveyed) was the Hyundai i10, with a total parts basket cost of R98 848.48.

Superminis

Winners in this category were the:

  • Renault Sandero Expression (R92 891)
  • Toyota Yaris 1,5 Xs (R100 943)
  • Ford Fiesta 1,0 Trend hatchback (R108 594).

The model with the most expensive parts was the Kia Rio 1.4 Hatch (R164 073.41).

Family favourites

Winners in this category were the:

  • Toyota Corolla 1,6 Quest (R65 341)
  • Toyota Corolla 1,6 Prestige sedan
  • Nissan Almera 1,5 Acenta.

The family car with the most expensive total parts basket was the Honda Civic Type R 2.0 Turbo (R309 761.19).

Compact crossovers

The cheapest cars to maintain among the surveyed compact crossovers were the:

  • Mahindra KUV100 Nxt (R68 638)
  • Suzuki Jimny 1,5 GA (R86 897)
  • Toyota Rush 1,5 S (R97 387).

The compact crossover with the most expensive total parts basket was the Hyundai Kona 1.0 TGDI (R170 655.65).

SUVs/crossovers

Winners in this category were the:

  • Toyota Fortuner 2,8 GD-6 auto (R80 171)
  • Haval H6 1,5T Premium (R91 071)
  • Subaru Forester 2,0i (R113 362).

The car in this category with the most expensive total parts basket was the Kia Sportage 2.0 CRD Ignite Plus (R213 777.16).

Executive SUVs/crossovers

Winners in this category were the:

  • Alfa Romeo Stelvio 2,0T Super Q4 (R135 029)
  • Toyota Prado 3,0DT VX (R199 428)
  • Jaguar E-Pace D180 HSE (R212 968).

The car with the most expensive parts was the BMW X5  x DRIVE 3.0 D Auto, at a whopping total parts basket cost of R384 394.66.

Executive saloons

The cheapest cars to maintain among the executive saloons included in the survey were the:

  • Volvo S60 Polestar (R214 362)
  • Audi A4 40TFSI (R227 503)
  • Lexus ES250 EX (R230 263).

The executive saloon with the most expensive total parts basket was the BMW 320 D Auto, with a total parts basket cost of R242 105.23.

Double-cab bakkies

Winners in this category were the:

  • Toyota Hilux 2,8 GD-6 auto (R79 660)
  • Isuzu D-Max 3,0 TD LX auto (R88 191)
  • GWM Steed 6 2,0 VGT Xscape (R94 372).

The double-cab bakkie with the most expensive total parts basket was the Mercedes X class, with a total parts basket cost of R147 252.14.

Single-cab bakkies

The cheapest cars to maintain in this category were the:

  • Nissan NP200 (R49 823) – this was the overall winner of all vehicles in the 2019 Kinsey report, and the only half-tonne bakkie (the rest are one-tonne bakkies)
  • Nissan NP300 2,5 TDi (R61 334)
  • Isuzu D-Max 2,5C TD (R65 326)
  • Toyota Hilux 2,4 GD-6 (R73 696).

The loser, with the most expensive total parts basket, was the Ford Ranger 2.2 D, with a total parts basket cost of R93 110.96.

At Pawn My Car, we offer loans against cars. You can use a car, bakkie, truck or boat that’s in your name to secure a loan quickly and easily, with no delays or laborious paperwork. For more information, contact us on 086 172 9648 or simply complete and submit our online application form.

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